How to build a fiberglass rocket, part 11: fin fillets

The epic fin-ale to the fin attachment series! (Pun intended.)

So far, we’ve attached the fins using the “through the wall” method with epoxy at several points: (1) the fin root, where it directly touches the motor mount tube, and (2) all along the inside edges of the fins and motor mount tube using a syringe to inject it. This created an incredibly strong foundation (especially by mixing some chopped carbon fiber into the epoxy), and at last we can turn to (3) the outside of the rocket to create fin fillets.

fiberglass rocket and fins on workbench, with masking tape creating lines
making tape to create lines

The first step here is to measure and mark approx. 3/8 inch from the joint, along both the airframe and the fin itself, and draw parallel lines on each. Then follow this up with masking tape along the full length of each line. Using this technique, you can apply the epoxy fillet, and when you remove the tape afterwards, it will leave a very clean edge. Generally you want to wait before removing the tape so the epoxy has a chance to partially cure – but it’s easiest to remove the tape if you do so before it fully cures.

rear view of rocket with epoxy fin fillets
aerodynamic and aesthetically pleasing

For the epoxy mixture, the difference this time will be the addition of a thickening agent so it’s not quite as runny and it maintains its shape. Specifically, this means first mixing the two part epoxy (resin and hardener), then mixing in some chopped carbon fiber as before, and finally adding the thickener.

As I mentioned earlier, I’m using West System resin and hardener, and also for the thickener. The stuff is extremely lightweight – so much that it’s almost difficult to even take the can’s lid on or off, as the slightest breeze or air movement will cause it to fly up into the air like dust. Of course, this is something that should be done only while wearing a respirator or face mask.

Once the epoxy is sufficiently thickened, it should have the consistency of peanut butter – spreadable, but will more or less hold its shape.

Finally, a round length of wood (e.g. a broomstick) or plastic (e.g. metal pipe or PVC pipe) will be very helpful at this stage, particularly one that has a 3/4″ or 1″ diameter. I happened to have some spare 3/4″ PVC pipe lying around from my earlier project running electrical wire to the shed to build the workshop. The idea here is to spread some epoxy on at the joint where each fin touches the rocket body, and then to use the PVC pipe to run along the full length, creating a nice, smooth, rounded fin fillet.

a first pass

Above is a picture showing my partial progress with this technique. It can take some practice getting the right epoxy consistency with the thickener, and also using the pipe to create the rounded fillet. But once finished, this will provide the third and final bond of the fins to the rocket body.

As noted above, you can wait before removing the masking tape, but don’t wait so long that the epoxy fully cures.

After one set of fins is complete, as shown above, you can rotate the rocket 120 degrees and repeat (although give the epoxy some time to cure, first, before rotating). Repeat a second time, and then rotate and repeat a third.

Once all the fin fillets are completed, you’re done with the actual rocket build! The rest is cosmetic work or just attaching things to this newly constructed rocket: priming and painting (which, frankly, is optional), attaching recovery harnesses and parachutes (slightly less optional but simple), and conducting ground testing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s