How to build a fiberglass rocket, part 10: epoxy injection for fins

Fair warning here: I’m actually splitting the “attaching the fins” information into three separate posts. This is not out of a sense of malice or sadism, but simply because there’s a lot going on with the fins.

The prior post (part 1 of 3 in this epic fin series) was basically the prep work and first few steps to secure the fins to the rocket body by using some epoxy and inserting the fin root through the wall where it can bond against the motor mount tube inside. Along with a printed fin alignment guide and a bunch of heavy objects, this keeps the fins in place and serves as a starting point for the multi-step approach for attaching them.

This post (part 2 of 3) involves epoxy, a syringe, and a bunch of strategically drilled holes. This might sound like the setup to a bad joke, but it’s actually literal and straightforward.

If you’ve been following along so far (whether with your actual fiberglass rocket build, or just conceptually in your head), you know that inside the airframe there is a motor mount tube, held in place and centered with the aptly-named centering rings. The top and bottom of each fin should just barely be touching a centering ring, inside.

fiberglass rocket with fins attached, sitting on workbench, partly suspended in air
ready to inject!

The idea here is to take the syringe and inject the epoxy into each hole. There’s two holes per fin (so 12 total in this case for 6 fins), with one hole on either side of each fin, roughly 1/2 inch away from the fin. Using a typical plastic syringe that you can find at a local drugstore, you can inject 10 ml at a time, and you should inject roughly 25 ml for each side of the rocket, split evenly among 4 holes. The rocket should be positioned horizontally and completely level, as in the above picture.

Once the epoxy has been injected into these 4 holes, you tilt the entire rocket forwards and then backwards, slowly, in order to move the epoxy around inside and completely coat the area where each fin touches the motor mount. The centering rings on each side should create a “dam” to prevent the epoxy from going any further past the edge of the fin, if everything is aligned reasonably well.

(If not, well, the epoxy may ooze out some of the other holes below a little. Not a huge deal, but may require a bit of extra cleanup.)

Once the epoxy is spread evenly inside, it needs some time to cure. Come back a few hours later. At this point, you can rotate the rocket 1/3 of the way around and repeat the process for the next 4 holes, and then finally a third time after that. Ensure each time that the rocket is level as the epoxy cures, so it doesn’t slowly ooze and collect in a lopsided fashion. This would not be ideal for a uniform fin attachment, it could also throw the rocket off balance in its weight.

epoxy in plastic mixing cup with popsicle stick on workbench
two part epoxy mix

Above is a picture of the two part epoxy mix (resin and hardener) when combined and thoroughly stirred in a small plastic cup. The syringe I used is pictured as well. You may need several since they can get clogged over time.

One final note here: you can also mix some chopped carbon fiber (pictured below) with the epoxy, and again mix thoroughly. The color will darken noticeably. This epoxy mixed with chopped carbon fiber will significantly strengthen the bond as it cures. In other words, those fins are never coming off.

epoxy darkened with chopped carbon fiber, in plastic mixing cup with popsicle stick on workbench
epoxy mixed with chopped carbon fiber

This epoxy injection technique is pretty cool, and it’s been tested and used successfully for many years. Try it!

In my next post (part 3 of 3 in this series on attaching fiberglass fins) I’ll briefly cover the final step: creating external fin fillets where each fin touches the rocket airframe. It gives one final layer of protection to ensure the fins are secured, and also looks more aerodynamic.

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