How to build a rocket workshop (part 10: the resurrection)

The much-anticipated finale to the workshop saga!

The last few posts covered the electrical work, from digging a trench to installing a sub-panel in the shed and running conduit out from the main panel in the house, and then the official inspection. I also briefly covered the similar process needed to run some ethernet cable out there.

With that work complete, it just left cleaning up and furnishing the inside to create a true workshop.

workshop interior view, with work benches and stool
welcome to the rocketry workshop!

Most of this work was mundane – sweeping up a cartoon-like cloud of dust around myself, using a shop vac to get up sawdust and debris, etc. I also set up a second workbench against the back wall, and a few houseplants just to lend some color to the shop. They get plenty of direct sunlight during the day through that window.

I installed a few shelves (see below) to hold bags and cases of tools and equipment, and got some circular holders to tidy up the multiple 100 ft extension cords. The fire extinguishers were already in the shed, but I decided to keep them around in case something catches on fire (extremely likely).

I also put up a second light fixture overhead (not pictured here), installed some additional pegboard for hanging tools, and a few other miscellaneous things.

workshop interior view, facing open door
shop vac helps tidy up

The primary reason I needed a workshop to begin with was just for more space – some workbench or table area to lay out parts, and measure, drill, cut, sand, glue, and generally build things. With that goal in mind, I can say: mission accomplished.

workshop interior view, with workbench and stoool
exit, stage right

Finally! Just a place to sit and assemble rockets. It’s only about 10×10 ft, but it’s a really practical space.

I may spruce up the inside or outside of this shop more over time, like adding some flooring, building a larger exterior deck/ porch, and so on. I have a few other ideas. But the core goal is complete, and I’ve already begun work on my next rocket, the Darkstar Extreme from Wildman Rocketry. Much more to come on that soon!

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